Monday, September 24, 2018

Noah and Matilda Pineapple

Another “prickly” block in my Noah and Matilda sew-a-long quilt! However, unlike the cactus, the pineapple was often seen on mid 19th century album quilts. The pineapple motif was a symbol of hospitality and was used as decoration on many household objects. It would have been pretty rare to have a real pineapple in your home in 1850. They had to come from the Caribbean and were frightfully expensive. (Come to think of it they aren’t cheap today!!).

I like the original block with its crisscrossed appliqued strips, but when I saw this fabric, it just screamed "pineapple" and I instantly thought of all the time I would be saving if I just let the fabric do the work for me.
As I near the end of this project, I find that I am simplifying the process more and more. I know it isn’t a race and heaven knows I can (and really do) work on more than one quilt at a time, but since I have decided to call it my “Ruby Anniversary Cake” I need to finish it in 2018 (our 40th anniversary was in July).

I think I can make it if I don’t take on any new projects of this magnitude…. Oops, too late, I hear MaryWitherwax calling my name!!

Actually, I owe this entire post to Dawn Cook Ronningen, because not only did she (and her daughter) produce the Noah and Matilda and Mary Witherwax patterns, Dawn's new book arrived on Saturday and - oh wow!
It is a fabulous book! I don't even collect sewing tools, but I have thoroughly enjoyed every page of this. This jockey cap pin cushion is among my favorites. It is packed with wonderful treats like this one.
You can order it from her Etsy site (here). Fun!

12 comments:

  1. What great pineapple fabric. Your handquilting also adds great texture for the pineapple. I was working on one of Dawn's patterns this weekend too :0)

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  2. This is a fascinating block and I love the fabric you chose for the pineapple. You do such lovely work.

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  3. Oh, wow! That's the perfect fabric to represent a pineapple. Why not simplify when you can and let the fabric do the work. I bet the original quilter would have done the same if she could have.

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  4. Brilliant move to let that perfect fabric do the work for you, Wendy! It makes a great pineapple!
    Did we already talk about the anniversary thing? Our 40th was in June.

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  5. What great fabric for your pineapple! Where did you ever find it?? Love that you simplified the block. It's perfect :) Oh my, that looks like a wonderful book!

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  6. So pretty Wendy! Your fabric is a perfect design. Fun to get ahead of yourself with new projects, isn't it? Happy belated Anniversary...I admire your determination. :)

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  7. Before I knew this was your post, the block caught my eye, it is so interesting and what a great use of the fabric, yes it does scream pineapple and I have some of it in my stash. I am loving your Noah and Matilda blocks and can't wait to see the big finish for your Ruby Anniversary.

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  8. I like your use of the fabric to create the impression of a pineapple's pattern. Don't you wonder how pineapples (expensive and rarely seen a century and a half ago in the States) became a symbol of hospitality? I do, and if I think about it too long, I'll have to go research it! I think simplifying is good, especially if it doesn't sacrifice to the impression of the original patterns. I don't think that will ever be a problem for you, Wendy. You're so careful with your choices of fabric!

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  9. Oh, that is really clever; the pineapple couldn't look any better. Belated congratulations on your 40th anniversary!

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  10. That pineapple fabric is so spot on! love the quilting too.
    Another great food name for this quilt and what a lovely quilt to mark your 40th.
    Dawn's new pattern and book look great.

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  11. Perfect pineapple! You were definitely wise to let the fabric do the work for you!

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  12. The fabric is perfect for the pineapple!!

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